What Would I Have to Do, Che?

I don’t know what I’m gonna do.  “Pearl Necklace” really don’t cost that much.

She’s really upset with me again
I didn’t give her what she likes
I don’t know what to tell her
Don’t know what to say
Everything got funky last night
She was really bombed
And I was really blown away
Until I asked her what she wanted
And this is what she had to say
A pearl necklace
She wanna pearl necklace
She wanna pearl necklace
She gets a charge out of bein’ so weird
Digs gettin’ downright strange.

According to your loss.  Don’t do work; there is no belly-ache strong-dong.  In the other place, prince hemi to my satisfaction I troll Glenn Greenwald, potential ivied–because I admire his conceit.  It is to stage, as if to bring off, astound (We?), bring on higher junk in vases vis-a-vis Greek noses touching.  I dim the lantern, texture’s crafted the same ___________________elevake

frawnt of you

So, I have to keep it gambit.  I guide a stone through the public.  Technically, its stump.  See, to the met-up racket, we have things to remember consistent of.  In your sixties, or heaven, seventies, you’re weird.

And I’m a bad boy, can ere was passive (idd’n ‘e, Clarisse?) consistency of a bad chemist.  Great fall.  The people’s Minnesotah doesn’t harken dem.  They hate the ocean.  Gotten a gulf, Texas print ’em;

A slight concession (to birthdays).  Rootin’ through the jonction.

T H A T S T R I F E C O L L O N A D E A N C Y
L S O
T I W A S N T S O U I X E T S D O E U R C
N A C C O S E E S N S L O T
T E M P L S Y H O U A W H A K W I H E O
D R E M E O N E L S T T I T T H Y F F N
S T N T Y D E A L K O O M
W C A T O M S O O L M
P I T E B L H O R W T H F A C Y V A R E G
T I T E S M O N T R I E U L A
E N R I G A L L I N U D R A R O U
Y O U N O T H T N E N D O U S N D O T B L
A I N H I N
T M I W E L D I A 1 0 6 1 0 7
S S I L T H N E
T F U T R R A O C K H U P A
U L L S E I O B E E I K F W H E N A L B E
I M S H A D U P S N E W E R E Z I W A N D
E T B A R I E T B A B O W O U H O L Y S M
E C A G H T E F O U T I L D T E D E I L E
1 0 8

come twice a week, protect the North, telly’d be Edmund Fitgerald, Office.  Put you to work for him.  You are technically blend off a ka-sploosh, an Ocean Spray.  What do you want, would it?  The blend snowy cabin a Nick tabby caravan (in sul latchie modern),  a coach restaurant confirm A is omina a […] What does a pettit suit it worn apkin?

Go iytch.

Higher…6.

Higher up you bend.

Hire off being rough.__________compulsive

At your level, read my mind.  Assume it’s holding thirty atm.  You’re touching bottom, tight.  sKFr.  I’m adopted you believe me with a chunk I didn’t see.  Whatever sayers.

Assets $1.  Can’t see the keys.  Scared of ’em.

The paper also identifies critical gaps in our knowledge base that hinder scientists’ ability to predict the pace and extent of future drought effects on forests.

“We currently have a pretty good handle on predicting the impacts of and drought on individual trees,” Clark said. “Ecologists have identified many of the important differences between species that explain how they respond differently to drought.”

But, he said, uncertainty still exists about what might happen at the species-wide or stand-wide levels, particularly in Eastern forests. “These are the scales where we really need reliable predictions so forest managers can take steps now to help reduce large-scale adverse future effects.”

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-02-drought-threatens-forests.html#jCp

Why did you feel it was important to make this film, and what were you hoping to accomplish?

First and foremost, the film and the story it tells deals with the movement for civil rights and, even more deeply, human rights. There is a tendency in this country to think that these movements are a thing of the past and, coming out of the 1960s in particular, that they were somehow addressed and resolved with everyone living happily ever after.

In fact, the opposite is true. These movements never cease, and it’s important to be reminded that this is indeed the case. A truly democratic society requires participation and hard work in regard to ensuring that human and civil rights are protected, uplifted, and always expanded. The movement never ends. This is most especially true for native people, who have become entirely invisible even though their issues — treaty rights, sovereignty, etc. — remain continuously under siege.

We’re not talking about Scalia, the Friend, or Scalia, the Grandfather. Virtually none of us knew him in those roles. We’re talking about Scalia, the highly polarizing, highly controversial Supreme Court justice whose actions and beliefs affected the lives of millions of people. We’re not guests at his family’s house for a wake. We’re citizens shaping how he and his public actions will be understood and remembered and perceived. Trying to suppress any criticisms of him, so that only adulation can flourish, is worse than irrational; it’s propagandistic.

That doesn’t mean one should express glee that Scalia is dead, nor does it mean that if one is a family friend of his relatives that one should spout criticisms in their grieving faces. But it most certainly does mean that from the moment public adulation of someone like this is permitted, so, too, must criticisms of him be permitted. That is especially true at an academic institution devoted to the study, practice, and debate of law. To insist that only one side is permitted to be heard — the side that hails Scalia as a benevolent genius — is as oppressive and anti-intellectual as it gets.

–Glenn Greenwald

The

Intercept

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